Tag: Concept of operations

BVLOS Survey for Regional Australia

BVLOS Survey for Regional Australia

BVLOS Survey for Regional Australia – In the vast expanses of Australia’s countryside, where the horizon stretches far beyond the eye can see, drones are becoming an indispensable tool for innovation and efficiency. The Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA), in its unwavering commitment to fostering growth and safety in the skies, has recently highlighted the potential and challenges of Beyond Visual Line of Sight (BVLOS) drone operations, particularly in the agricultural sector and remote regions. The findings from their comprehensive survey in March 2024 not only offer a glimpse into the current landscape but also chart a course for the future. The link to the survey can be found here.

A Collective Vision for Drones in Australia

Drones are not just flying cameras or high-tech toys; they are pivotal instruments driving Australia towards a more innovative and efficient future. From boosting delivery services to revolutionising agricultural practices, these remotely piloted aircraft (RPAs) promise to usher in a new era of productivity and sustainability. With an estimated 10% of Australian agricultural businesses already harnessing the power of drones—a figure expected to soar by 2040—the skies are brimming with potential.

Some key highlights from the survey were as shown in the below table representing the key operational profiles and activities being most applicable to respondents.

BVLOS Survey for Regional Australia

Credit – Civil Aviation Safety Authority

BVLOS Survey for Regional Australia – Listening to the Voices of Innovation

Understanding the unique needs and hurdles faced by drone operators in regional Australia was paramount for CASA. The survey’s 443 respondents, representing a diverse array of sectors, provided invaluable insights into the realities of drone operations. Their feedback highlights a pressing need for regulatory frameworks that not only ensure safety but also embrace the technological strides being made in the drone industry.

Unveiling Challenges and Charting Solutions

Among the key challenges highlighted were the complexities and costs associated with obtaining BVLOS approvals, especially for agricultural and remote operations. Respondents called for more streamlined processes, suggesting that innovations such as area permits and simplified approvals could significantly enhance operational efficiency. The feedback underscores a collective desire for a regulatory environment that supports, rather than hinders, the transformative potential of drones.

The Main Barriers to Operation Highlighted by Respondents

A Path Forward: Recommendations for Change – BVLOS Survey for Regional Australia

The survey’s findings have not fallen on deaf ears. Respondents put forth a series of recommendations aimed at reducing barriers to BVLOS operations. These include crafting specific regulations for agriculture, introducing more efficient approval processes, and adopting a risk-based approach that balances operational needs with safety considerations. Such changes could catalyze the broader adoption of drones, making advanced farming techniques and emergency responses more accessible and effective.

BVLOS Survey for Regional Australia – CASA’s Commitment to Progress

CASA extends its gratitude to all survey participants, whose contributions are invaluable in shaping the future of drone operations in Australia. The authority is dedicated to working alongside stakeholders to refine regulations and support the industry’s growth. By fostering an environment where safety and innovation coexist, CASA aims to ensure that Australia remains at the forefront of drone technology, benefiting communities across the nation.

Joining Hands for a Safer, More Efficient Tomorrow

The journey towards a more innovative and efficient Australia, powered by drone technology, is a collective endeavour. As CASA continues to review and adjust regulations in response to the evolving needs of the drone industry, input from operators across the country remains crucial. Together, we can navigate the challenges and opportunities of the skies, ensuring that drones continue to play a pivotal role in shaping our future.

In this era of technological advancement, the potential of drones to transform industries and communities is boundless. As we look to the horizon, the insights from CASA’s survey not only illuminate the path ahead but also invite us to envision a future where drones are integral to our way of life, driving growth and innovation in every corner of Australia.

Stay Informed and Engaged with Hover UAV

Keeping abreast of the latest developments in BVLOS regulations is essential for entities looking to harness the full potential of drone technology. Hover UAV is dedicated to providing up-to-date information and guidance to stakeholders across various industries. Whether you’re a seasoned drone operator or exploring the possibilities drones offer, we invite you to engage in an obligation-free discussion with our team. Together, we can navigate the regulatory landscape, ensuring your operations are compliant and poised to thrive in the ever-evolving world of drone technology.

To learn more about how BVLOS regulations may impact your operations and to explore tailored solutions that meet your unique needs, don’t hesitate to contact Hover UAV. Let’s work together to harness the transformative power of drones, driving innovation and efficiency across Australia and beyond.

Specific Operations Risk Assessment (SORA)

Specific Operations Risk Assessment (SORA)

Specific Operations Risk Assessment (SORA): Insights from Hover UAV

At Hover UAV, we understand the critical importance of safety and compliance in drone operations. As the industry continues to grow, so does the need for a structured approach to assess and mitigate risks. This is where Specific Operations Risk Assessment (SORA) becomes essential. Let’s delve into what SORA is and why it’s indispensable for safe and compliant Remotely Piloted Aircraft System (RPAS) operations.

What Is the Specific Operations Risk Assessment (SORA)?

Specific Operations Risk Assessment (SORA) is a comprehensive framework designed to evaluate the risks involved in drone operations. It is particularly relevant for operations that require specific permissions from the regulator, such as beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS) flights.

SORA encompasses a variety of documents and guidelines that aid in identifying the potential risks of an RPA flight and outline the measures to mitigate these risks. It divides risks into two main categories: Ground Risk Class (GRC) and Air Risk Class (ARC), which help assess the likelihood of incidents occurring on the ground and in the air, respectively. To manage these risks effectively, SORA introduces Specific Assurance and Integrity Levels (SAIL), which are adjusted through the application of various mitigating measures and threat barriers.

Specific Operations Risk Assessment (SORA)

Essential Elements for a Successful SORA

For a SORA to be successful, several key elements are required:

  • Concept of Operations (ConOps): This is a detailed document that provides the technical, operational, and system information to assess the risks associated with the proposed operation. It describes the flight plan and how it will be executed.
  • Ground Risk Class (GRC) Determination: The GRC evaluates the risk of a drone impacting a person on the ground. This evaluation considers factors such as the drone’s size, speed, flight type (VLOS or BVLOS), the operational scenario, flight area, and the presence of people. Mitigating measures, such as Emergency Response Plans (ERP), emergency parachutes, or active geofencing, can reduce the GRC.
  • Air Risk Class (ARC) Determination: The ARC assesses the probability of the drone encountering a crewed aircraft. It is influenced by whether the flight is in controlled or uncontrolled airspace, its proximity to airports, and whether it flies over urban or rural areas. Strategic and tactical mitigations can lower the ARC.
  • Specific Assurance and Integrity Level (SAIL) Determination: SAIL provides a confidence level for the flight operation, integrating ground and air risk analyses. It is expressed in levels ranging from 1 to 6, each specifying objectives and supportive activities.
  • Operational Safety Objectives (OSO): Based on the SAIL levels, OSOs outline requirements for the drone, its operator, and the operating organization. These include standards for the operator’s knowledge and skills, as well as technical assessments of the drone and its equipment.
BVLOS Training

Hover UAV’s Role in Your SORA Journey

Hover UAV is committed to promoting safety and compliance in the drone industry. With our experience conducting diverse drone operations and possessing a proven track record in developing many successful SORA safety cases, we are well-positioned to assist organisations in navigating the SORA process. Whether your operations involve challenging BVLOS flights or activities in populated areas, our team is ready to support you in preparing all necessary SORA documentation effectively and efficiently.

For organisations looking to enhance the safety and compliance of their drone operations, Hover UAV offers tailored support and expertise. Contact our team of SORA specialists for assistance and embark on your journey to safer and more compliant drone operations.

By embracing SORA and its approach to risk assessment and mitigation, organisations can safeguard their operations, protect people and property, and leverage the capabilities of drone technology.

Remote Operators Certificate (reOC) - Hover UAV

Remote Operators Certificate (ReOC)

At Hover UAV, we understand the dynamic and evolving landscape of drone technology, especially for those looking to harness these aerial innovations for commercial gain. Central to navigating this terrain is understanding the Remote Operators Certificate (ReOC) — an essential for commercial drone operations in Australia, akin to the traditional Air Operator’s Certificate in manned aviation.

Dive into the Remote Operators Certificate (ReOC)

The ReOC opens doors to expansive commercial drone uses beyond the hobbyist level, enabling a wide range of activities that are not possible under standard operational conditions. Whether it’s operating heavier drones, managing expansive drone operations, or venturing beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS), the ReOC is your license to soar. A pivotal requirement for the Remote Operators Certificate (ReOC) eligibility is designating a Chief Remote Pilot, who must be a Remote Pilot Licence (RePL) holder with robust knowledge and experience pertinent to your drone activities, alongside passing a CASA or CASA-approved delegate flight exam.

Remote Operators Certificate

The Advantages of Holding a ReOC

Obtaining a ReOC goes beyond regulatory compliance; it is a strategic asset that vastly extends the scope of legal drone operations for your business. This certification is crucial for any entity aiming to transcend basic drone operations, offering new avenues for growth in areas like high-end aerial photography and detailed surveying.

How Hover UAV Elevates Your ReOC Journey

Hover UAV stands at the forefront of facilitating your Remote Operators Certificate (ReOC) acquisition process. Our expert consultancy services are tailored to navigate the complexities of the ReOC application, ensuring a seamless transition for your business. Here’s what we offer:

  • Development of bespoke operations manuals and operational libraries that adhere to CASA’s stringent standards.
  • Preparation assessments to prime you for CASA’s rigorous evaluation.
  • Continuous, personalised guidance throughout the application process, guaranteeing clear and compliant progression.
BVLOS Training

Start Your Remote Operator Certificate (ReOC) Adventure with Hover UAV

Embarking on the journey to secure a ReOC marks the beginning of a new chapter in commercial drone operations for your business. Hover UAV is committed to demystifying the regulatory landscape, empowering you to concentrate on expanding and innovating your drone capabilities. Partner with us to navigate the path to ReOC certification seamlessly, unlocking the immense potential of your commercial drone ventures. Reach out to Hover UAV today, and let’s take your drone operations to unparalleled heights. For more information contact Hover UAV for assistance.

Hover UAV - AAUS Finalists

Hover UAV: AAUS Finalist Awards for Education and Safety 2024

Hover UAV – AAUS Finalists. At Hover UAV, we are filled with immense pride and gratitude as we share the news of our selection as a finalist in the prestigious Australian Association for Uncrewed Systems (AAUS) awards for 2024, notably in the Education and Safety category. This accolade highlights our pioneering initiative, the “Chief Remote Pilot Support and Train the Trainer Packages,” specifically tailored to elevate the expertise and knowledge of Chief Remote Pilots (CRPs) throughout Australia.

Program Highlights:

  • Target Audience: Our program is meticulously designed for CRPs who navigate the complexities of staying abreast with the ever-evolving industry changes while maintaining active engagement with the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA).
  • Objective: We aim to comprehensively update CRPs on the latest regulatory knowledge, significantly enhance their practical skills, and facilitate an effective knowledge transfer process.
  • Components: The program’s structure is comprehensive, including personalized one-on-one regulation and training sessions, in-depth updates on regulations, dedicated flight test support, and specific training on the latest hardware/software technologies. This is further augmented by our bespoke Train the Trainer packs, designed to empower CRPs with the tools needed for internal team training.

Impact and Value:

The “Chief Remote Pilot Support and Train the Trainer Packages” program has made a substantial contribution towards enhancing safety and efficiency within the unmanned systems industry. By addressing the pressing need for CRPs to possess up-to-date knowledge and skills, our initiative stands out for its practicality and indispensability. Through personalized regulatory update sessions and hands-on training, we ensure that CRPs are thoroughly prepared to navigate their multifaceted roles. The tangible positive outcomes, including improved exam pass rates and the successful assimilation of new regulations, attest to the program’s significant impact on operational safety and competence.

As we celebrate this recognition, we also want to extend our heartfelt congratulations to all the other finalists. Being acknowledged alongside such distinguished contributions to the unmanned systems industry is truly an honor, reflecting a collective dedication to propelling the sector forward in terms of safety and education.

Hover UAV - AAUS Finalists

Our unwavering commitment to enhancing the skills and safety practices of Chief Remote Pilots has not only earned us a finalist position in the AAUS awards but also underscores our broader commitment to the advancement of the unmanned systems industry. This nomination serves as a testament to our team’s hard work and the innovative approach we’ve taken to address the unique challenges faced by CRPs, reinforcing our dedication to leading the way in safety and education within this dynamic field.

Should you or your organisation require any CRP assistance please feel free to contact Hover UAV for more information.

The Sky's The Limit

The Sky’s the Limit: Australia’s Drone Market Set for Explosive Growth


The Sky’s the Limit – Australia stands on the cusp of a remarkable evolution in the drone industry, with projections indicating a trajectory of rapid growth and innovation. In this blog, we delve into the findings of a groundbreaking report by Scyne Advisory commissioned for Air Services Australia which forecasts the Australian drone market’s expansion through 2043. This analysis not only underscores the potential for advanced air mobility but also highlights the critical role of drones in reshaping various sectors, from transport and logistics to agriculture and environmental management.

A Glimpse into the Future:
The drone industry in Australia is experiencing a pivotal transformation. Expected to grow by an average of 20% annually over the next 20 years, the sector is set to reach an astonishing 60 million flights by 2043. This growth is concentrated in urban areas, signaling the advent of a new era in aviation and logistics, propelled by significant technological advancements and regulatory developments.

Credit:- Airservices Australia / Scyne Advisory

Technological and Regulatory Catalysts:
The evolution from speculative discussions to tangible prototypes and services marks a new chapter for drones in Australia. Innovations spurred by the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic have played a crucial role in this transition. The industry’s maturity is now paving the way for sophisticated uses, such as goods delivery and passenger transport, transforming what was once science fiction into reality.

The Importance of a UTM System:
As drones become integral to various commercial applications, the need for an efficient Uncrewed Aircraft System Traffic Management (UTM) system becomes increasingly apparent. The anticipated influx of drone flights emphasizes the necessity for a framework that ensures safe and equitable airspace access, highlighting the ongoing collaboration between the government and the industry to refine regulatory frameworks conducive to growth.

Reshaping Industries:
The projected boom in the drone market offers innovative solutions to traditional challenges, creating new opportunities for economic growth across sectors. This evolution signifies a shift towards more connected, efficient, and innovative approaches to mobility and transportation, marking a pivotal moment in Australia’s journey towards embracing advanced air mobility.


Australia’s drone industry is at a turning point, with the potential to significantly impact various sectors by offering innovative solutions and creating new opportunities for economic growth. The key to unlocking this potential lies in continued technological innovation, regulatory progress, and collaboration between the government and the industry. As we look towards the future, it’s clear that the sky’s the limit for Australia’s drone market, promising a new era of efficiency and innovation in aviation and beyond.


Ready to join the drone revolution? Contact Hover UAV today to launch your organisation’s drone program. For a full report download, click here.

Aviation Hall of Fame - Jackie Dujmovic

Jackie Dujmovic, Inducted into the Women in Emerging Aviation Hall of Fame

We’re thrilled to share that Jackie Dujmovic, CEO of Hover UAV, will be among the 11 distinguished women joining the Women in Emerging Aviation Technologies Hall of Fame. This honour will be formally bestowed upon her during the 7th Annual Women in Emerging Aviation Technologies Awards, slated to be held at the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum in Washington D.C., come October 25th. Those in attendance can anticipate mingling with these esteemed Hall of Fame entrants.

Women and Drones have continually celebrated women paving the way in the aviation sphere, their innovations and visions promising a future rich in technological and scientific leaps.

Recently, Women and Drones unveiled this year’s list of luminaries to be inducted into the Women in Emerging Aviation Technologies Hall of Fame. These inductees, an embodiment of experience and expertise, hail from diverse backgrounds within the Uncrewed Aerial Systems and Advanced Air Mobility sectors. Sabrewing Aircraft Company champions this cause by sponsoring the awards. As per Ed De Reyes, Sabrewing’s CEO, they’re keen on celebrating the women driving growth, innovation, and creativity in aviation.

Previous Hall of Fame inductees and this year’s ceremony hosts include Miriam McNabb, the editor of DRONELIFE.com, and Marilyn Pearson, CAE’s Global Regulatory Affairs Lead for AAM/eVTOL/UAS. Pearson highlights the game-changing technologies transforming aviation, akin to the jet engine’s introduction. McNabb eagerly awaits the induction of these trailblazers in Washington DC, lauding their mark on the drone industry.

From the impressive nominations received from around the world, a panel of judges has chosen these eleven outstanding women as 2023 Hall of Fame inductees:

Loretta Alkalay – Aviation attorney and Adjunct Professor at Vaughn College of Aeronautics and Technology. Alkalay holds an FAA remote pilot certificate with a sUAS rating and also serves as a regulatory consultant, specializing in issues related to compliance with federal aviation regulations including drone rules.

Barbara Bollard – Professor Bollard of Australia is a leader in the field of drone remote sensing, renowned for her pioneering research in both Antarctica and extreme desert environments. Her groundbreaking achievements have significantly advanced the capabilities of drone technology, transforming data collection and analysis in these challenging terrains.

Jackie Dujmovic – Founder and CEO of Hover UAV in Australia. As a commercial UAS Pilot and accomplished Chief Remote Pilot, Dujmovic’s expertise is establishing robust communication and procedural frameworks with regulators across local, national, and international spheres. Her ultimate mission is the seamless integration of drone systems into everyday life, commitments to safety, compliance, and navigating intricate operational approvals.

Desiree Ekstein – Founder of On The Go Video and accomplished figure in the UAS industry. Ekstein is dedicated to promoting safety and education as a Lead FAASTeam Representative and AUVSI TOP Level 3 pilot. She is also involved in the “Girls Take Flight” initiative which encourages young women to explore careers in the science and technology fields.

Laurie Grindle – Deputy Center Director, NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center. Grindle assists in the management of the NASA field centre, focusing on strategy, business processes, and institutional management. She has also served in leadership roles overseeing Unmanned Air Vehicles and the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew vehicle abort test booster.

Sonet Kock – Director of Drone Policy & Regulatory Development. Sonet is the Founder and Managing Director of AviComply (Pty) Ltd, a leading South African consulting firm specializing in Aviation Compliance Solutions. She is known for her expertise and extensive experience in Aviation Regulatory Compliance and has dedicated her efforts to ensuring quality and safety assurance for both crewed and uncrewed flight operations.

Mercy Makau – President and Founder of the Young Aviator Club of Africa as well as Chairperson of Drone Club Kenya. Makau is considered a passionate change maker, deeply committed to empowering youth and promoting gender equity in Africa’s aviation and aerospace industry.

Jenn Player – Senior Director of Global Aviation Regulatory Affairs at Skydio. Jenn collaborates with customers, regulators, and standards development organizations to advance autonomy and unlock safe and effective docked drone operations. Jenn’s early work to integrate drones into the National Airspace System led to the first long-range BVLOS civil flight in the continental United States.

Dr Debbie Saunders – Founder, CEO and Chief Remote Pilot of Wildlife Drones. The Australian company is transforming biodiversity conservation by developing innovative technological solutions, including the world’s most advanced drone-based radio-telemetry sensor that empowers endangered and invasive species managers globally to simultaneously track the movements of many animals from a drone in real time.

Annalisa Russell-Smith – Chief Strategy Officer, Flyby Technology. The company flew the COVID virus between laboratories and chemotherapy to isolated communities and Russell-Smith was the first civilian female in the United Kingdom to become a Beyond Visual Line of Sight (BVLOS) pilot.

Abigail Smith – Executive Director (A), of the FAA’s UAS Security Office, which serves as the focal point for all matters related to drone and air mobility (AAM) security in U.S. airspace. Within this role, Smith leads the FAA’s efforts to safely integrate detection and mitigation systems for drones and AAM operations into the National Airspace System.

About the Women in Emerging Aviation Technologies Awards: Initiated in 2017, Women and Drones has been shining a spotlight on those reshaping the UAS/AAM industry. Every year, a global hunt singles out women and entities bringing innovation, enhancing the UAS/AAM industry’s reputation, fostering inclusivity in STEM and aviation, and propelling the industry closer to equal gender representation.

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Australian Aviation Support Business of the Year - Hover UAV

Hover UAV Clinches 2023 Aviation Support Business of the Year at the Australian Aviation Awards

A Milestone Event in the Aviation Industry

The Australian Aviation Awards, the cornerstone event for the aviation sector in Australia, has just concluded its 2023 ceremony, and what a phenomenal experience it was! Held in August, the black-tie gala was nothing short of spectacular, featuring aviation luminaries, industry thought leaders and professionals who have devoted their careers to the advancement of aviation in Australia. Among the list of prestigious accolades, one award stood out for its testament to dedication, innovation, and service excellence: the Aviation Support Business of the Year. The winner? Hover UAV.

Celebrating Excellence in Support and Innovation

Hover UAV has proven itself to be more than just a company; it is a vanguard in the ever-evolving landscape of Australian aviation. Their work in Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) has not only set new standards in terms of efficiency and safety but also pushed the boundaries of technological innovation in the sector.

The Aviation Support Business of the Year award celebrates companies that have shown exemplary service, operational excellence, and an unwavering commitment to elevate the aviation sector. With this award, Hover UAV has achieved a milestone that symbolises industry-wide recognition of its efforts to create safer and more efficient airspace.

A Platform for Connection and Visibility

The Australian Aviation Awards aims to foster greater connectivity within the aviation industry, offering a platform for professionals and businesses to showcase their accomplishments. Open to all, irrespective of location or specialisation, the awards are quickly becoming the universal benchmark for excellence in Australian aviation.

Hover UAV’s victory in this esteemed category, therefore, is a monumental achievement. Not just an endorsement by a panel of industry experts, this win signifies a nod from the entire aviation community, recognising the critical role that support services like Hover UAV play in enriching the aviation ecosystem.

A Bright Future

This national awards program encourages businesses like Hover UAV to continually strive for excellence, propelling the Australian aviation industry into the global spotlight.

Hover UAV’s accolade is an indicator of the company’s promising trajectory and its potential to bring groundbreaking changes to how we perceive and interact with our skies. If the Australian Aviation Awards are a barometer for the future of aviation in the country, then the winds are surely blowing in the direction of unprecedented innovation and global prominence.


For more updates on the Australian Aviation Awards and insights into the aviation industry, https://australianaviation.com.au/australian-aviation-awards/winners/2023-winners-and-finalists.

BVLOS Regulatory Processes

BVLOS Regulatory Processes

In this interview, it is discussed the intricacies and challenges in optimising regulatory processes for Beyond Visual Line of Sight (BVLOS) drone operations. Jackie Dujmovic, CEO of Hover UAV calls attention to the necessity for clear and direct regulations, to simplify the approval process. They underscore the need to comprehend the concept of operations and devise suitable technical solutions accordingly. Jackie refers to progressive solutions such as parachutes, redundant systems, and software programming to reduce operational risks. She advocates for cooperation, seeking support, and educating regulators as vital tactics in managing the regulatory landscape. The conversation concludes with a discussion about the future impact of regulatory processes in maximising the potential of BVLOS operations and the importance of implementing standard scenarios to expedite the process.

Discussion:- Jackie Dujmovic, Hover UAV & Jason San Souci of FlytBase
Changes to BVLOS EVLOS Qualifications

Changes to BVLOS EVLOS Requirements

Changes to BVLOS EVLOS Requirements

CASA releases new changes for qualifications required for EVLOS operations and BVLOS Enclosed Operations

CASA has just announced the release of a new instrument for RPAS operators in Australia – the CASA EX27/23 – Remotely Piloted Aircraft Operations Beyond Visual Line of Sight Exemption 2023. This instrument, which comes into effect today, will be valid until August 31, 2024. It replaces the previous instrument, EX46/21, and requires those currently operating EVLOS and BVLOS to update their CASA operations manual.

“Now both EVLOS Class I and Class II no longer require a Remote Pilot to hold a pass in IREX or BVLOS OCTA Exam”

The new CASA EX27/23 instrument brings some exciting and additional changes for operators. Firstly, it now allows for the operation of both EVLOS Class 1 and EVLOS Class 2 without requiring the Remote Pilot to hold a pass in the IREX or the CASA-approved OCTA exam or the need for a supervising remote pilot to hold those qualifications. Whereas the old instrument only allowed this for Class 1. However, it’s important to note that the ReOC holder will still need to be approved for EVLOS Class 1 or EVLOS Class 1 and 2 and have approved documents and procedures.

“BVLOS enclosed operations no longer require a Remote Pilot to hold a pass in IREX or BVLOS OCTA Exam or need a supervising Remote Pilot with those qualifications ”

This new instrument still permits BVLOS enclosed operations without requiring the Remote Pilot to hold a pass in the IREX or the CASA-approved OCTA exam however there is now no need for a supervising Remote Pilot. Again, the ReOC holder will still need to be approved for BVLOS enclosed operations and have approved documents and procedures. Enclosed operations refer to RPA operations that take place within a building or other structure or a naturally occurring or manufactured space underground.

Like the previous instrument, the CASA EX27/23 instrument still allows for BVLOS operations to be conducted with a supervising remote pilot. This means that a remote pilot who doesn’t hold a pass in the IREX or approved BVLOS OCTA exam can have a supervising remote pilot who does hold these licenses supervise their flight. The supervising pilot will need to be located at the place where the remote pilot is operating, readily accessible to the remote pilot, and immediately available to advise and direct them.

Overall, the release of the CASA EX27/23 instrument brings some exciting opportunities for RPAS operators in Australia. If you require any assistance adding these changes into your current operations please reach out to the team at Hover UAV today.

A full copy of the instrument can be found here and is copied below. Changes to BVLOS EVLOS Requirements

Changes to BVLOS EVLOS Qualifications

Instrument number CASA EX27/23

I, CHRISTOPHER PAUL MONAHAN, Executive Manager, National Operations & Standards, a delegate of CASA, make this instrument under regulations 11.160 and 11.205 of the Civil Aviation Safety Regulations 1998.

[Signed Chris Monahan]

Christopher P. Monahan
Executive Manager, National Operations & Standards

5 April 2023

CASA EX27/23 — Remotely Piloted Aircraft Operations Beyond Visual Line of Sight Exemption 2023

1      Name

                 This instrument is CASA EX27/23 — Remotely Piloted Aircraft Operations Beyond Visual Line of Sight Exemption 2023.

2      Duration

              This instrument:

(a)   commences on the day after it is registered; and

(b)   is repealed at the end of 31 August 2024.

3      Repeal of instrument number CASA EX46/21

                 CASA EX46/21 — Remotely Piloted Aircraft Operations Beyond Visual Line of Sight Instrument 2021 is repealed.

4      Interpretation

Note   In this instrument, certain terms and expressions have the same meaning as they have in the Civil Aviation Act 1988 and the regulations. These include: operated within the visual line of sight, remote pilot licence and RPA.

     (1) In this instrument:

documented practices and procedures has the meaning given by subsection 1.04(2) of the Part 101 Manual of Standards.

enclosed operation means an RPA operation in which an RPA is operated within a building or other structure, or a naturally occurring or manufactured space underground, in circumstances where:

(a)   it is physically impossible for the RPA to escape and fly away from the building, structure or space if the RPA is no longer under the control of the remote pilot operating the RPA; and

(b)   if the RPA collides with any part of the building, structure or periphery of the space, no material from the RPA, or building, structure or periphery of the space, can move or escape and cause injury to a person outside the building, structure or space.

EVLOS operation has the meaning given by section 5.04 of the Part 101 Manual of Standards.

exempted flight means a flight of an RPA that is operated beyond visual line of sight of the person operating the RPA at any time during the flight.

remote pilot means:

(a)   the holder of a remote pilot license; or

(b)   a person who is taken to hold a remote pilot license under sub regulation 202.461(3) of CASR.

RPA operator means a person who is certified as an RPA operator under regulation 101.335 of CASR.

supervising remote pilot, for an RPA operation, means a remote pilot who:

(a)   meets the requirements of sub regulation 101.300(4) of CASR for operating an RPA beyond visual line of sight; and

(b)   either:

          (i)  is the RPA operator of the RPA being operated during the RPA operation; or

         (ii)  if the remote pilot is not the RPA operator of the RPA — has been appointed by the RPA operator to supervise the person operating the RPA during the RPA operation.

     (2) In this instrument, an RPA is operated beyond visual line of sight of the person operating the RPA if it is not operated within the visual line of sight of the person.

5      Exemptions

     (1) A remote pilot who, as an RPA operator or member of an RPA operator’s personnel, operates an RPA for an exempted flight is exempt from compliance with paragraph 101.300(4)(a) of CASR.

     (2) Subject to subsection (3), a remote pilot who, as a member of an RPA operator’s personnel, operates an RPA for an exempted flight is exempt from compliance with sub-regulation 101.073(1) of CASR.

     (3) The exemption granted under subsection (2) only applies if the RPA operator holds an approval, under regulation 101.029 of CASR, for the operator’s personnel to operate the RPA beyond visual line of sight.

     (4) The exemptions are subject to the conditions stated in section 6.

6      Conditions

     (1) The remote pilot must ensure the RPA operation complies with the documented practices and procedures for operating the RPA for an exempted flight.

     (2) Subject to subsection (4), the remote pilot must operate the RPA under the immediate supervision of the supervising remote pilot, for the RPA operation, who is:

(a)   at the place where the remote pilot is located; and

(b)   readily accessible to the remote pilot; and

(c)   immediately available to advise, and direct, the remote pilot.

Note   This subsection does not limit the supervising remote pilot observing multiple flights of RPAs, for the RPA operator, at the same time.

     (3)     Subject to subsection (4), the remote pilot must comply with the directions, in relation to the RPA operation, of the supervising remote pilot for the RPA operation.     (4) Subsections (2) and (3) do not apply if the RPA operation is an enclosed operation or EVLOS operation.

BVLOS Operations

BVLOS Operations in the Next Decade

This podcast held during the 2023 NestGen Flytbase event “BVLOS Operations in the Next Decade: What to Expect in 2033” features a thought leadership discussion with top CXOs in the drone industry. Hover UAVs Jackie Dujmovic was fortunate to be on this esteemed panel giving her leadership thoughts. The topic of discussion was the outlook on drone autonomy in the future. The panel discussed the challenges and opportunities that drone autonomy will bring and the potential impact on various industries. They also discussed the importance of safety and regulation in enabling the widespread use of autonomous drones, as well as the need for continued innovation in drone technology. Overall, the panelists predict a significant increase in the use of autonomous drones in the next decade, particularly in industries such as agriculture, transportation, and logistics.

For more information on BVLOS operations, approvals, or training please do not hesitate to gain contact Hover UAV for more information.

BVLOS Operations in the Next Decade. What to expect in 2033
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